Meet Our Growers

Smart Earth Camelina Corp. is dedicated to developing the best Camelina varieties available while working hand-in-hand with our growers to provide excellent production practices.

We are the leading global Camelina enterprise and we maintain a continuous plant-breeding program unmatched in scale and scope.

Our plant-breeding activities provide a significant pipeline of trait development to ensure maximum yield and profitability for our growers for years to come.

Camelina is a unique low-input dryland oilseed crop and is a high-yielding source of nutritionally important Omega fatty acids, delivered in a high anti-oxidant background. It provides excellent quality meal and oil for animal feed and aquaculture. Camelina can be produced on marginal lands with significantly lower inputs than other oilseeds such as canola while providing competitive yields. The oil profile is similar to flax in that it provides high-Omega oil but has greater oxidative stability than flax.

Camelina oil is in high demand for aquaculture, improving the N6:N3 ratio in farmed fish while delivering a more sustainable marine-free diet and so reduces the requirement to use fish oil. Camelina meal produces high-Omega eggs in layers and meat in broilers. Promising markets include dairy, companion pets and human health and nutrition.

Meet some of our dedicated growers below.

Interviewer: So Chris, what made you look at a crop like camelina oil in the first place?

Chris: I've always been interested in dabbling in different crops and giving them a try. Probably never grow hemp again but I'm still growing camelina so I guess that's a good sign.

Interviewer: Do you think it's particularly well suited to a certain soil type or farm type?

Chris: I think it's probably well suited to pretty well any farm, but as far as soil types I've grown it on heavy clay and I've grown it on lighter soils. It really seems to perform better than anything I've grown on the lighter soils. Even in a dry year it seems to do fairly well.

Interviewer: So how do the input costs compare to some of the other crops you grow?

Chris: Looking at even your cereals, camelina is probably one of my lowest inputs on the farm for sure.


Interviewer: What kind of yields do you usually get

Chris: I've had anywhere from think my best was 39 bushels per acre and my worst yield was 27 bushels an acre. Which I'm still profitable on. It was an extremely dry year where we had some weed issues, putting it into dry soil maybe a little too deep. We're learning still and we'll learn every year and just get better.

Dennis Keller - Landis, Saskatchewan

I've been farming for about 40 years. I enjoy the outdoors and my crops have varied over the years. Something we've tried in the past 4 or 5 years is camelina. It's a good fit for lighter soils, sandier soils and drier areas. It can be grown on better quality land as well. Our yields have varied a little bit from the beginning till now. It's a learning experience and we've found that the inputs are probably about half of what canola is so the net return on it when you working everything out is a pretty good dollar per acre.

Why should you consider growing Camelina?

✔️ Camelina is a unique low-input dryland oilseed crop. On some farms input costs as low as $100/acre can yield profits as high as $100/acre.

✔️ Seed costs as low as $25 per acre.

✔️ Our markets are domestic – no problems with Chinese exports

✔️ Camelina can be produced on marginal lands with significantly lower inputs than canola while providing competitive yields on lighter soils and a shorter growing season.

✔️ It is resistant to flea beetles, blackleg and blackspot. Seed treatment with insecticide and fungicides and late-season insecticide sprays are not necessary.

✔️ We’re a Saskatchewan company – your money stays here to support local business, creating jobs here and helping us re-invest in the province.

To find out more call our crop production specialist Carlene at 306-220-2737 or fill in this contact form:

Thanks!
This field is required
This field is required

Meet Our Growers

Smart Earth Camelina Corp. is dedicated to developing the best Camelina varieties available while working hand-in-hand with our growers to provide excellent production practices.

We are the leading global Camelina enterprise and we maintain a continuous plant-breeding program unmatched in scale and scope.

Our plant-breeding activities provide a significant pipeline of trait development to ensure maximum yield and profitability for our growers for years to come.

Camelina is a unique low-input dryland oilseed crop and is a high-yielding source of nutritionally important Omega fatty acids, delivered in a high anti-oxidant background. It provides excellent quality meal and oil for animal feed and aquaculture. Camelina can be produced on marginal lands with significantly lower inputs than other oilseeds such as canola while providing competitive yields. The oil profile is similar to flax in that it provides high-Omega oil but has greater oxidative stability than flax.

Camelina oil is in high demand for aquaculture, improving the N6:N3 ratio in farmed fish while delivering a more sustainable marine-free diet and so reduces the requirement to use fish oil. Camelina meal produces high-Omega eggs in layers and meat in broilers. Promising markets include dairy, companion pets and human health and nutrition.

Meet some of our dedicated growers below.

Interviewer: So Chris, what made you look at a crop like camelina oil in the first place?

Chris: I've always been interested in dabbling in different crops and giving them a try. Probably never grow hemp again but I'm still growing camelina so I guess that's a good sign.

Interviewer: Do you think it's particularly well suited to a certain soil type or farm type?

Chris: I think it's probably well suited to pretty well any farm, but as far as soil types I've grown it on heavy clay and I've grown it on lighter soils. It really seems to perform better than anything I've grown on the lighter soils. Even in a dry year it seems to do fairly well.

Interviewer: So how do the input costs compare to some of the other crops you grow?

Chris: Looking at even your cereals, camelina is probably one of my lowest inputs on the farm for sure.

Interviewer: What kind of yields do you usually get

Chris: I've had anywhere from think my best was 39 bushels per acre and my worst yield was 27 bushels an acre. Which I'm still profitable on. It was an extremely dry year where we had some weed issues, putting it into dry soil maybe a little too deep. We're learning still and we'll learn every year and just get better.


Dennis Keller - Landis, Saskatchewan

I've been farming for about 40 years. I enjoy the outdoors and my crops have varied over the years. Something we've tried in the past 4 or 5 years is camelina. It's a good fit for lighter soils, sandier soils and drier areas. It can be grown on better quality land as well. Our yields have varied a little bit from the beginning till now. It's a learning experience and we've found that the inputs are probably about half of what canola is so the net return on it when you working everything out is a pretty good dollar per acre.


Why should you consider growing Camelina?

✔️ Camelina is a unique low-input dryland oilseed crop. On some farms input costs as low as $100/acre can yield profits as high as $100/acre.

✔️ Seed costs as low as $25 per acre.

✔️ Our markets are domestic – no problems with Chinese exports

✔️ Camelina can be produced on marginal lands with significantly lower inputs than canola while providing competitive yields on lighter soils and a shorter growing season.

✔️ It is resistant to flea beetles, blackleg and blackspot. Seed treatment with insecticide and fungicides and late-season insecticide sprays are not necessary.

✔️ We’re a Saskatchewan company – your money stays here to support local business, creating jobs here and helping us re-invest in the province.

To find out more call our crop production specialist Carlene at 306-220-2737 or fill in this contact form:

Thanks!
This field is required
This field is required